Facts & Figures: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

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Note: These publications were published in 2020 and 2021. For most-recent data, consult the data sources at the end of the publication.


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Data points

 

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Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Health Impact of ACEs in Ohio

Key data findings

  • Nearly two-thirds of Ohioans have been exposed to ACEs. Ohioans of color and Ohioans with low incomes, disabilities and/or who are residents of urban and Appalachian counties are more likely to experience multiple ACEs.
  • Among Ohioans who reported exposure to at least one ACE, the most common type of ACE reported was emotional abuse (57%), followed by substance use by a household member (41%) and divorce (36%).
  • Preventing ACEs can improve health. For example, if exposure to ACEs were eliminated among Ohioans, an estimated 36% of depression diagnoses could be prevented.
  • Focusing action on specific ACEs may yield more significant health impacts. For example, if adequate supports and policies were in place to prevent parental or other household member incarceration, an estimated 7% of current smoking and 12% of limited healthcare access due to cost could also be eliminated.

Suggested citation: Health Policy Institute of Ohio. “Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Health Impact of ACEs in Ohio,” August 2020.


 

Cover photo of policy brief: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Economic Impact of ACEs in Ohio

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Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Economic Impact of ACEs in Ohio

Key data findings

  • Preventing ACEs can reduce healthcare and other spending. If ACEs exposure were eliminated, more than $10 billion in annual healthcare and related spending could be avoided in Ohio.
  • Approximately $319 million in lost wages due to missed work days could also be prevented annually if ACEs exposure were eliminated.
  • Focusing action on specific ACEs, particularly those associated with behavioral health, can yield significant savings. For example, over $4.5 billion in annual spending to treat depression is attributed to ACEs exposure. Significant healthcare costs for treating depression could be avoided by focusing on preventing and mitigating the impacts of abuse.

Suggested citation: “Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): Economic Impact of ACEs in Ohio,” Health Policy Institute of Ohio, 2021.  


 

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Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): A strategic approach to prevent ACEs in Ohio

Key data findings

  • Nearly two-thirds (61%) of Ohio adults reported exposure to ACEs during childhood.
  • Ohioans could save over $1 billion annually in public and private healthcare and related spending if just 10% of the cost attributable to ACEs exposure were avoided.
  • Ohioans who reported experiencing multiple ACEs were also more likely to report poor health outcomes and behaviors — Ohioans of color and Ohioans with low income, disabilities and/or who live in urban and Appalachian counties are more likely to experience multiple ACEs.

Suggested citation: “Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs): A strategic approach to prevent ACEs in Ohio,” Health Policy Institute of Ohio, 2021.  


 

 

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Strategies to prevent Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in Ohio: Ensuring a strong start for children and strengthening economic supports for families

Key data findings

  • Early childhood education programs have been found to prevent and mitigate ACEs, such as mental illness in the home, and have strong evidence of return on investment, with an estimated cost-benefit ratio of $3.15.
  • Research indicates that family income in early childhood is a predictor of health outcomes later in life and that childhood poverty is linked to diminished educational and employment opportunities across the life course.
  • As of February 2022, there was at least one early childhood home visiting provider in every Ohio county using a model identified as “evidence-based” by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) review.
  • Medical-legal partnerships impact ACES by reducing stress and improving the well-being of children and their families and have a cost-benefit ratio of $6.98.
  • Family income supports reduce poverty and increase employment, among other outcomes. Supports may also address many of the physical, social and economic conditions (e.g., limited economic resources, low educational attainment, poor mental health) that contribute to ACEs and the generational impacts of ACEs.

Suggested citation: “Strategies to prevent Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in Ohio: Ensuring a strong start for children and strengthening economic supports for families,” Health Policy Institute of Ohio, 2021.